China trademark registration

Register Your IP in China Because This is What I’m Talking About

Stan Abrams over at China Hearsay has woken up (what’s with all the posts on sleep deprivation anyway?) and posted on a recent Chinese court decision finding for Motorola in a design patent infringement case. The post is aptly entitled, IP Win for Motorola, and it makes some very good points. It begins by telling

China IP

China Innovation: When Will That Be?

Fascinating post over at This is China, entitled, Are We Innovative Yet? The China Challenge. [link no longer exists] The post relays a conversation with a Chinese national who believes China is not innovative and never will be. She bases this on China’s educational system, parents not letting their kids decide what to study, and

International IP lawyer

Three Biggest Misconceptions Regarding China IP. One Trumps All.

IP Dragon has a very short, but highly relevant post, entitled, Catherine Sun Debunks Misconceptions About Chinese IP Protection. Ms. Sun sees the following as the three biggest misconceptions: 1. IP is not enforceable in China. 2. Keeping brands and technology within the U.S. will keep them safe. 3. Counterfeiting products are always of poor

China Software Piracy

China’s Software Piracy Declining Ever So Slowly

Reuters article just out on Microsoft’s successes in reducing piracy in China and thereby increasing its revenue. The article notes how Microsoft “is seeing the benefits of more stringent intellectual property policies in China, with a decline in piracy rates and improved results at its mainstay Windows division.” It also notes that China is “by

China counterfeit lawyers

Fake Pens In China Write/Writ Large

Very interesting LA Times article on China’s fake pen business, entitled, Fake pens write their own ticket. The article starts out by talking about how China has adopted stringent anti-counterfeiting laws and “knockoff markets in large coastal cities such as Shanghai and Shenzhen have been shut down or pushed underground.” However, things are very different

China IP registrations (Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights and Licensing Agreements)

China IP Litigation: You Can Make It If You Try

The Experience Not Logic blog has a post, entitled, China IP Litigation Data: What Does it Mean? tabulating the results in IP litigation from various Chinese courts, involving both domestic versus domestic litigation and foreign versus domestic litigation. I hate to draw too many deep conclusions from such raw data, but even I who am always

China counterfeit products

How To Stay Ahead Of China Counterfeiters

Interesting post on IP Dragon, entitled What Global Players Could Learn From Wii versus Vii. It is on how Nintendo is beating back a (legal/illegal?) Chinese rival making a game called Vii that mimics and even seeks to improve upon the Wii. IP Dragon puts forth the following fine tips on staying ahead of counterfeiters:

China Design Patents

China Patent Infringement: Don’t Get Mad, Get Even

New paper just out by Mei Ying Gechlik, entitled, “Protecting Intellectual Property in Chinese Courts: An Analysis of Recent Patent Judgments.” The paper touts the Patent Reexamination Board (PRB) of China’s State Intellectual Property Office as the best place to pursue patent infringement cases. Gelchik’s paper also chastises US companies for not filing their Chinese

China Software Piracy

China Piracy: If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Join ‘Em

Well not exactly. Paramount Studios will be teaming up with Warner Studios to sell DVDs in China for $3 per movie. In addition to these rock bottom prices, the movies will be out on DVD within two months of their theatrical release. The plan here is to undercut the pirated versions. However, since these legal

China Law Blog
CHINALAWBLOG

Getting A Patent In China

Kelly Spors, the Wall Street Journal’s spot on Q&A columnist on entrepreneurship and small business answered a question today on securing a China patent. The question asked of Ms. Spors by a U.S. patent holder is whether it is “worth spending the money for a patent in China to prevent knockoffs from being made there?” Ms.