China Trademark Protection

Bad Faith TM Applicants, Bad News

The China National Intellectual Property Administration (CNIPA) has published a draft revision of the country’s Trademark Law and called for comments from the public. In our first post on the potential implications of the revised law for international brands, we looked at proposed changes to the definition of what constitutes a trademark and the absolute

International Cease and Desist Letter

Cease and Desist Letters to Protect Your IP: Just the Facts and Law

My law firm often gets calls from companies alleging “a company is selling their product under their trade name on Amazon” and asking us to send a cease and desist letter “right away” to get that company to stop violating their IP. Our typical response is to say it is seldom a good idea to

Vietnam manufacturing lawyer

China Trademark Registration Q&A

As regular followers of this blog well know, we quite often stress the importance of registering trademarks in China, and the need to do so promptly. See for example China Trademarks: More Useful and More Necessary Than Ever. Today, I want to address some of the questions our China trademark attorneys fairly regularly get about

China trademark lawyer

Green Trademarks in China are Getting Red Lights

Green trademarks are running into red lights in China. Just about every application to register a mark that includes the word “green” is being rejected. Rumor has it that concerns over greenwashing are to blame, though given the opaque nature of the application process this cannot be confirmed. Greenwashing is the “practice of making unwarranted

Global Trademark Protection Under the Madrid Protocol

Does U.S. Trademark Law Apply Worldwide?

The United States Supreme Court has agreed to hear a trademark infringement case arising under the Lanham Act that has huge implications for manufacturers and sellers of products based outside the U.S. The case is Hetronic International, Inc. v. Hetronic Germany GMBH, et al. The case arises from a $114 million judgment for an industrial

Crypto regulation

Crypto Trademarks and China

Crypto trademarks are a no-go in China. In line with the country’s prohibitions on cryptocurrencies, the China National Intellectual Property Administration (CNIPA) will not register trademarks that describe crypto goods and/or services. Brands in the crypto space must be mindful of this reality when crafting brand and intellectual property rights protection strategies for China. China

United States patents

Patents and U.S. Customs

This is the final installment in our multipart series designed to help right holders and importers better understand the opportunities and obligations that attach to intellectual property rights (IPR) in the U.S. Customs regulatory environment. This installment explores the main issues surrounding the protection and enforcement of patents in the international trade arena and offers best practice tips for

China copyright registrations

Copyrights and U.S. Customs, Part 2

This post is the second part of the second installment in a multipart series designed to help right holders and importers better understand the opportunities and obligations that attach to intellectual property rights (IPR) in the U.S. Customs regulatory environment. Part 1 of the second installment discussed copyright infringement levels recognized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection

China copyright registration lawyers

Copyrights and U.S. Customs, Part 1

We are pleased to present the second installment in a multipart series designed to help right holders and importers better understand the opportunities and obligations that attach to intellectual property rights (IPR) in the U.S. Customs regulatory environment. The focus of this installment is on copyrights. Owing to the diversity of considerations wrapped up in

Trademarks and international trade

IPR and International Trade: Trademarks, Part 2

This post is part of a multipart series designed to help right holders and importers better understand the opportunities and obligations that attach to intellectual property rights (IPR) in the international trade regulatory environment. The first installment in this series is on trademarks, and is split into two parts. Part 1 explored infringement levels recognized by