An Innovative Approach to Stopping China Counterfeits!??

Register your trademark with China customs

One of my law firm’s international trademark lawyers recently got the following email from a client regarding an AmCham China IP event:

Just saw that AmCham is putting on this Innovative Approach to Stop Counterfeit Goods and just wanted to congratulate you for having convinced me to institute that approach nearly five years ago.

The “innovative” approach to which both AmCham and the writer of this email are referring is the following, as described by AmCham in its lead-up to this talk:

Many companies with large overseas operations have to deal with lost revenues and reputational damage caused by counterfeit goods. As well as being a large potential market, China is also major manufacturing hub, for both fake as well as genuine products. Despite improvements in the legal framework regarding intellectual property rights, companies are often disappointed by the results of their attempts to prevent the proliferation of counterfeit goods through through the courts, the Ministry of Commerce and local governments.

Now there is a new, innovative approach to stemming the trade of counterfeit products. Based on their experience working with numerous clients, experts … will share details on how the Customs Bureau can help companies in the fight against counterfeits.

Seeing as how none of our China attorneys attended this event, we do not know what was discussed at it. But we can tell you what we have been saying on this blog and to our clients since at least 2013, and that is that not only must you file for a China trademark for your brands and your logos, but you should also then register your granted China trademark with China customs to stem counterfeits of your products from leaving China.

For instance, earlier this year, in China Trademarks: Customs Helps Those Who Help Themselves one of our China IP lawyers, wrote the following regarding the real benefits to be gained by registering your China trademarks with China customs: “For trademark owners, customs seizures can be a valuable part of an anti-infringement strategy. But don’t expect much help from the customs authorities if you can’t be bothered to help yourself.” We have for at least five years been calling for exactly what the title of that post would lead you to expect: that you should not only be sure to file for a trademark in China, you should also be sure to take that China trademark once you get it and register it with China customs. It bears repeating what we said in that post because it so nicely sets out what exactly this will entail and why it is of such importance:

As we have written a number of times — see China Manufacturing: China Trademarks are the Most Important Thing of All, and China’s New Trademark Environment — the essential first step in any China IP strategy is to register your trademarks with China’s Trademark Office. Because China is a first-to-file country, until you register a trademark you have no rights in that trademark. But a trademark registration alone will not limit the spread of counterfeit goods. A trademark registration merely gives you the legal capacity to enforce your rights to that mark, and should properly be seen as one of the pieces in an overall strategy.

For any company concerned about counterfeit goods coming from China, the next step should be registering your trademark with Chinese Customs. This is not a legal requirement but a practical one: though China Customs officials have discretion to check every outgoing shipment for trademark infringement against the Trademark Office database, in reality they only check against the Customs database. No separate registration with Customs means no enforcement by Customs.

If you register your mark with Customs, they will contact you any time they discover a shipment of possibly infringing goods. At that point you have three working days to request seizure of the goods. Assuming you request seizure (and post a bond), Customs will inspect the goods. If Customs subsequently concludes the goods are infringing, they will invariably either donate the goods to charity (if the infringing mark can be removed) or destroy them entirely. The cost of destruction, and of storing the goods during the inspection process, will be deducted from your bond.

Registration with China Customs generally takes three to five months and can only be done after China’s Trademark Office has issued a trademark certificate. The latter currently takes approximately fourteen months, which means that within nineteen months of the date you file your trademark application, Chinese Customs could be helping to stop counterfeit goods from being exported from China.

Nineteen months can be an eternity in the retail world. Whether you’re a toy company producing dolls in Shanghai, a home video company making DVDs in Guangzhou, or a luxury goods company manufacturing high-end purses in Qingdao, there’s only one approach that makes sense. Register your China trademark now. Then register it again.

So though we never saw registering your China trademark with China customs as innovative, we have always viewed it as important, and that really is all that matters in any event.

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