canna law blog

The Future of Marijuana Licensing: Greater Barriers to Entry?

We’re starting to see a distinct trend with state-sanctioned marijuana operational licenses: the “pay-to-play, greatest barrier to entry” model. In this sort of system, there is usually some combination of the following, all geared towards reducing the number of cannabis businesses actually granted a license and towards making sure that those with licenses are very well-funded:

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Seattle Changes Its Tune (Again) About Medical Cannabis

Seattle has been on a roller-coaster ride with medical cannabis since summer 2010. We’ve blogged before about how the Emerald City, which once embraced collective garden access points (a/k/a medical marijuana dispensaries), has gone somewhat sour on them in recent months due to a general lack of state regulation. At one point, Seattle even threatened

canna law blog

Nevada Marijuana Update: Dispensaries For Sale, And More

Last week the Nevada Senate Committee on Finance unanimously voted to approve SB276 to reallocate dispensary licenses initially meant for rural counties, but never claimed. In total, there are eight licenses potentially up for grabs in Las Vegas and Three in the Reno area. Although not previously reported, the bill also includes a provision that

canna law blog

Comparing Marijuana Licensing Models

One of the key provisions states enact when they pass marijuana legislation is their model for how the state will dole out marijuana business licenses. We have worked on license applications in many states, including Washington, Nevada, Florida Illinois, Minnesota, New York,  Every state has presented unique challenges, but how they run the licensing process

canna law blog

New York Cannabis Licensing: The Basics*

Here in New York, it feels like we are (finally) off to the races. The New York State Department of Health recently posted the application for medical marijuana manufacturers and dispensaries, with two very important deadlines. The first is a May 5 at 4:00pm EST deadline to submit any questions to the Department regarding the application.

canna law blog

Washington State Gets Closer to a Single Marijuana Marketplace

Last week, the Washington State House passed its own version of a bill that seeks to repair both Initiative 502 for recreational marijuana and current medical marijuana laws. The goal of this bill is to make I-502 businesses more competitive with the existing medical and illegal marketplaces and to ensure harmony between recreational and medical cannabis

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Nevada Marijuana: SB 372 Is About More Than Cats and Dogs

In March, Nevada Democratic Senator Tick Segerblom introduced a new piece of legislation concerning production, manufacturing, distribution, and use of medical marijuana, raising a few eyebrows along the way. What makes Senate Bill 372 so interesting is that it will allow veterinarians to issue medical marijuana cards to pets if their owners are Nevada residents and if the

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More Marijuana Taxes: Multi-State Income Taxation

Because marijuana remains illegal on the federal level, transporting it across state lines is a federal crime. It is therefore understandable then that most marijuana companies consider their state tax obligations to be limited to just one state. However, as the cannabis industry expands, out-of-state investors need to consider the state income tax impact of their

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Will Medical and Recreational Cannabis Be Kept Separate in Oregon?

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, every state with existing medical marijuana laws that implements a parallel recreational regime will, at some point, have to grapple with whether the two industries should merge into one. Cue Oregon and its current dialogue over what to do about the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) and

canna law blog

Marijuana In Alaska Is Now Legal: What Does That Mean?

On February 24th, Alaska became the third state to legalize adults using and possessing certain amounts of marijuana. Despite this development, you cannot start selling cannabis willy-nilly in Alaska. You will need to register with the state to cultivate, manufacture, and distribute cannabis for public consumption. And the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board (ABCB), the agency