Alison Malsbury
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  For our clients in the cannabis space, from licensed operators to ancillary service providers, we’ve found that virtually no area of business (and no contract) is immune from the unique regulatory concerns of the industry. Our firm represents many ancillary companies that do business with cannabis operators, including software companies, delivery platforms, and other […]

Julie Hamill
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We’ve written about the potential benefits of harnessing the power of blockchain technology to track and trace cannabis from seed to sale and provide an effective regulatory tool for governments (see here and here). We’ve also warned of the risks and dangers (and outright scams) associated with many cryptocurrencies and the heightened risks that come […]

Hilary Bricken
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In California, under the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis and Regulation Safety Act (MAUCRSA), temporary licenses began issuing to cannabis businesses on January 1, 2018. Since then, the state agencies in charge of MAUCRSA’s implementation (the Bureau of Cannabis Control (BCC), the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), and the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA)) have […]

Griffen Thorne
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Two years ago, we published a series of posts about the cannabis industry’s embrace of the Internet of Things (“IoT”)—the network of physical objects connected through the Internet—for use in everything from garden sensors to dispensers. In that same series, we also discussed some of the potential legal risks and ramifications of using the IoT […]

Canna Law Blog
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We have previously discussed blockchain technology and the effect it can have on the cannabis industry here and here. This post serves as a more detailed analysis of how blockchain can and may disrupt the tracking of cannabis from seed to sale, specifically within the new California adult use market. Currently, cannabis businesses are spending […]

Julie Hamill
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Consolidation, Connection and Automation Differentiate Blockchain from Current Technologies Following my last post about blockchain technology and the cannabis industry, a Canna Law Blog reader commented, “[m]aybe I’m missing something. How is this better than just scanning a barcode when the item changes hands like they do with FedEx?” Great question. I asked similar questions early on […]

Julie Hamill
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IBM is getting into the cannabis business. On November 1, the US computer manufacturer submitted a proposal to the Government of British Columbia touting the benefits of its blockchain technology for supply chain management in Canada’s nascent cannabis industry. According to IBM, blockchain will allow B.C. to “transparently capture the history of cannabis through the […]

Hilary Bricken
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Our cannabis business lawyers are always getting pitched on “creative solutions” to the cannabis industry’s banking problem. Because marijuana is still federally illegal, most banks will not provide financial services to marijuana businesses, even though FinCEN issued guidelines to allow financial institutions to provide bank accounts to the state-legal pot businesses. Many tout Bitcoin as the solution. Bitcoin is viewed as the world’s first completely […]

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About this Blog

The Canna Law Blog™ is a forum for discussion about the practical aspects of cannabis law and how it impacts those involved in this growing industry. We will provide insight into how canna businesspeople can use the law to their advantage…

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Please be mindful that possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana are all federal crimes and that this blog is not intended to give you any legal advice, much less lead you to believe that marijuana is legal under federal law.

 
 

COVID-19 Update: Since March 5, all of our attorneys and staff have been working remotely to ensure social distancing.
We are continuing to work on our clients’ matters and we are still accepting new clients. We are here for you.

 

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