Canna Law Blog
by

Many people think owning and operating a cannabis business is a dream job. The reality is that any dream job can quickly become a nightmare when your business gets pulled into a dispute. Failing to resolve disputes early can be shockingly expensive. Discovery — of documents and by depositions — is usually costly, and risky too. For example, a court recently fined a company $50,000-a-day for failing to produce all the voluminous documents its opponents demanded.

Canna Law Blog is hosting a free webinar on August 14th to discuss cost-effective solutions to keep your cannabis business out of court. “The Top 12 Alternative Dispute Resolution Strategies” will include personal success stories and testimonies from cannabis litigation attorneys John Rapp (WA and NY), Jihee Ahn (OR and CA), and Jesse Mondry (OR and MN). These experienced dispute resolution attorneys will break down the path most disputes follow and give you the tools you need to effectively manage disputes as they occur.

This webinar will also encourage audience questions. Bring your “real world” experience to the conversation and our legal team will provide you advice and knowledge to help you run your business conflict-free. You can send your questions in advance when you register here today. Hear the answers when you join us at 12:30 PST on Wednesday, August 14th.

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Search

 
 

About this Blog

The Canna Law Blog™ is a forum for discussion about the practical aspects of cannabis law and how it impacts those involved in this growing industry. We will provide insight into how canna businesspeople can use the law to their advantage…

Read More

 
 

Stay Connected

   

 

SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL

 
 

Topics

Archives

 
 
 
 

Disclaimer

Please be mindful that possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana are all federal crimes and that this blog is not intended to give you any legal advice, much less lead you to believe that marijuana is legal under federal law.