Pot As Porn?

Pot as Porn?

Free speech recently came under attack by new Colorado State laws restricting where cannabis magazines can be located and how they can be presented to customers.  Colorado’s laws mandate that “magazines whose primary focus is marijuana or marijuana businesses are only [to be] sold in retail marijuana stores or behind the counter in establishments where persons under twenty-one years of age are present.”

This means that a retail outlet selling cannabis publications will not be able to display these magazines throughout their establishment. As put by Denver’s Westword Blog, “[r]ather, [cannabis] issues will be next to porn mags, with their covers presumably shielded to protect children — and customers will have to ask clerks to grab copies for them.”

Needless to say this new law is not going over well in all quarters.  Warren Eddson, a Colorado cannabis attorney, was quoted saying that “[the people of Colorado] said to regulate marijuana like alcohol . . . but apparently, our legislature wants to regulate it like porn.” Eddson went on to note:

[This move by Colorado] could be devastating for both the industry as a whole and consumers in terms of cutting back on information and ways to see new products — because a lot of people aren’t going to want the icky feeling of having to go into a 7-Eleven and ask, “Can I see the magazine behind the brown paper bag?”

High Times Magazine has already filed a free speech lawsuit seeking to overturn the state’s new law. Two Colorado publications, The Daily Doobie and The Hemp Connoisseur (also known as THC Magazine) have joined as plaintiffs in the lawsuit

Treating cannabis as a social taboo conflicts with trying to emphasize responsible adult use. Cannabis should be treated like alcohol and High Times should be as freely available in retail outlets as The Bartender’s Little Black Book.