Monitor Your Cannabis Trademark Because it Matters

Cannabis trademark lawyersWith so much discussion surrounding the difficulties of obtaining trademark protection for cannabis-related marks, it’s easy to forget that the battle isn’t over when a registration issues. Even after you have completed the onerous process of prosecuting your trademark application, there is no automatic guarantee that others won’t attempt to use your mark, or a confusingly similar mark. Enforcing your trademark requires constant monitoring to ensure that others are not infringing your mark.

Although the USPTO will vet your application against marks that have already been federally registered, and will issue your trademark registration, they will not actively monitor or seek out infringers, nor will they prosecute infringers. Monitoring for and prosecuting infringers is your job, as the trademark owner. There is nothing stopping other companies from adopting your name, or a variation on your name, for their own use. They may not be successful in securing a federal trademark application due to likelihood of confusion with your mark, but they can continue using the mark until someone makes them stop.

Vigilance on the part of a trademark owner is key to preventing infringement. Here, we’re including some basic tips for monitoring potential infringers of your mark.

First, regularly search the Internet. This is common sense. Perform Google searches for your trademark, and for your logo if you have one. Google Alerts comes in handy here as well. Set up an automated search and receive email alerts every time new pages containing your mark are indexed.

If you really want to delve into things, search the Trademark Electronic Search System (TESS) on the USPTO website. This search engine allows you to search the USPTO’s database of registered trademarks and pending applications to find marks that may be similar to yours. Pending applications may give you some insight into companies that are using or attempting to use marks that are similar to or the same as your own. For additional information on searching the USPTO’s database, which can get a bit complicated, go here.

Aside from self-monitoring, there are many companies and law firms that provide trademark monitoring services for their clients. These companies conduct regular monitoring searches for your mark.

And of course if you do encounter a company you believe to be infringing your trademark, you should contact a cannabis IP attorney right away. An experienced IP attorney can walk you through your options for dealing with an infringer, including cease and desist letters, settlement negotiations, and litigation.