Canna Law Blog
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Cannabis Production

So you’ve set your sights on joining the next generation of Oregon cannabis producers. Congratulations! You’ve identified talented growers, you’ve resolved the intractable indoor vs. outdoor cannabis growing dilemma, you’ve saved up some money, and now you are eager to get your cannabis operation up and running.

But what’s next? Your first question is a classic: Where will I grow?

When you apply for an Oregon Liquor Control Commission license, you will need to prove you have a deed or lease to an eligible property. A letter of intent to lease or to purchase will also suffice, but the OLCC will not actually issue the license until you close the lease or sale. You should work with a realtor with experience in the cannabis industry to identify a few possible locations. As you begin your search, remember the following:

Not all counties and cities are alikeOn the most basic level, you need to be aware of the various cities or counties that have banned recreational producers outright. The OLCC maintains a list of these hostile local governments and you may be sad to hear that Grass Valley, Oregon is still off-limits!

Even the cannabis friendly local governments vary significantly in their local requirements, with some counties going to great efforts to be cannabis friendly, and others putting up an unfortunate amount of red tape. An exhaustive county-by-county or city-by-city analysis is beyond the scope of this post and we recommend you speak with cannabis entrepreneurs and professionals who have worked with your top choices for county or city to get a sense of potential local government roadblocks.

Distribution Channels. Though rural land is likely cheaper, your best markets will likely be in the cities. It is never too early to begin cultivating relationships with wholesalers, processors and even retailers to help bridge this gap. Proximity to testing labs is also a plus.

Perform Your Due DiligenceOnce you find a location in a friendly area with room for your operation, you need to ensure that the property complies with all state, county, and municipal requirements and regulations. This can be done by thoroughly reviewing county codes, city comprehensive plans, land use regulations, relevant zoning ordinances, and CC&Rs and, in some cases, talking with the appropriate government officials. You also need to be sure your property has access to adequate water as you will be required to show proof of “water rights,” and adequate power.

Failing to do due diligence on a property can have disastrous consequences. We recently had a cannabis client come to my law firm ready to close on a perfect piece of real estate in a location with a cannabis-friendly local government. This company had even paid for certain improvements to the property, and it was just days away from closing on the property transaction. Fortunately, as soon as we were provided the counties’ records on the property, we noted a provision from the 1980s that prohibited their business. We identified this issue just in time to prevent the purchase and free up our client to move on to greener pastures.

Once you’ve acquired rights to your perfect cannabis property, you are ready to apply for a Land Use Compatibility Statement (LUCS) from the local jurisdiction and to begin preparing the property for the OLCC licensing/inspection process. Part 2 of this series can be found here.

One response to “How to Open an Oregon Recreational Grow Operation – Part 1: Location, Location, Location”

  1. Please do not underestimate the importance of having a valid water right for rural properties. The land you purchase may have irrigation rights, but these may not allow you to begin use in a commercial grow house without changing the type of use and season of use. Check with a Certified Water Rights Examiner in your state.

    The transfer process or application for a new permit can take a year or more to complete. Water right law is frustrating if you haven’t dealt with it before. Have someone on your team who has dealt with it and can shepherd the process through to completion.

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The Canna Law Blog™ is a forum for discussion about the practical aspects of cannabis law and how it impacts those involved in this growing industry. We will provide insight into how canna businesspeople can use the law to their advantage…

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Please be mindful that possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana are all federal crimes and that this blog is not intended to give you any legal advice, much less lead you to believe that marijuana is legal under federal law.