Hilary Bricken
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Recreational marijuanaWhite House Press Secretary Sean Spicer spoke today at a press conference on how he expects the Department of Justice to handle state-legal marijuana in America. In response to a question on how the Trump Administration will handle recreational marijuana, Spicer had this to say:

Well I think that’s a question for the Department of Justice . . . I do believe you’ll see greater enforcement of it. Because again there’s a big difference between the medical use … that’s very different than the recreational use, which is something the Department of Justice will be further looking into.”

There’s a big difference between [medical marijuana] and recreational marijuana, and I think when you see something like the opioid addiction crisis blossoming in so many states around this country, the last thing we should be doing is encouraging people. There is still a federal law that we need to abide by when it comes to recreational marijuana.”

Regardless of Spicer’s factually wrong take on the relationship between marijuana and opioid use, marijuana industry folks should not fret just yet.  Out of everything Spicer had to say, the key point is that marijuana enforcement falls on the Department of Justice and Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The job of the Press Secretary is “to act as spokesperson for the executive branch of the United States government administration, especially with regard to the President, senior executives, and policies” and the fate of the marijuana industry is not going to be decided in one White House press conference by the White House Press Secretary. The Department of Justice has so far declined to comment on Spicer’s briefing. It also bears mentioning that the Cole Memo setting out how the Department of Justice will treat state-legal marijuana (both medical and recreational) is still alive and well.

The bottom line. Though it is certainly unsettling to listen to Spicer predict increased enforcement of recreational marijuana businesses and to use stupid opium trope to boot, it is not time to lose heart or cash out. Will the jobs-focused Trump Administration really want to shut down cannabis businesses in multiple states and add a slew of hard-working people to the unemployment rolls? I don’t think so, but of course only time will tell.

 

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The Canna Law Blog™ is a forum for discussion about the practical aspects of cannabis law and how it impacts those involved in this growing industry. We will provide insight into how canna businesspeople can use the law to their advantage…

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Please be mindful that possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana are all federal crimes and that this blog is not intended to give you any legal advice, much less lead you to believe that marijuana is legal under federal law.